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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the great social science mysteries of the past 20 years is why is crime down so much. here in new york it's most dramatic but all over the country it's been going down. the other thing is dna evidence in the exonerations because of dna and the tremendous work the innocence project and other lawyers have done to show how imperfect our legal system is. that translates directly into jurors saying, you know, we're just not sure enough to impose the death penalty as much as we have in the past. and you take those two things, just fewer murders to prosecute and more reluctant jurors and you have a really dramatic change in how the public -- in how death penalty is used. >> do you think that continues? >> it seems to me that it depends on the types of crime that you're talking about. if you're talking about a sandy hook or situation where there's mass murderer, children involved, terrorist inspired activity, my guess is that you'll continue to see pretty strong support. even not that our legal system should reflect public opinion but obviously people still a ma yoert of americans still do believ
] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. inspired by perfection. great science to be learned. >> dance tweeted people can't drink until they're 21. what made the teacher think teaching kids to make beer is a good idea? >> thank you for your responses. i hope everybody has a great day. "fox & friends" starts now. >>> good morning. it is wednesday, october 30. i'm elisabeth hasselbeck. all eyes on washington today as lawmakers prepare to grill kathleen sebelius on the disastrous obamacare rollout. will she take the fault or keep pointing that finger. >> i think there are going to be a lot of fingers. no wonder these two didn't look very friendly. russians handing out goody bags that spy on people. clever. >> plus before you pay seven bucks for a latte, listen up because we've gotted best cup of coffee that will not break the bank. "fox & friends" starts next. >> hello
the infrastructure of the country, to invest in education, invest in some, you know, basic science whether it's biomedical science or other forms of science to create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to borrow, and so this today port impolice tick and an tag niche is fool hardy. you can't say i'm for jobs, jobs, jobs in the american economy to work. at the same time, you strangle it of funding. you know, the whole government shut down by some estimates cost 24 billion dollars in economic activity. people lost jobs, lost paychecks, with respect hired, and we're still reeling from that. >> host: on the subject of the shut down, how do you any the 2014 election will shake out? thanks to the shut down. >> guest: well, communist dog, thank you for writing in. i think right now that there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles get quicker, and quicker, shorter and shorter, and we'll have another government budget and debt ceiling fight in january and february, may happen again coming summer, next fall, before the election, and so i think by and
think science is evil and it's going to destroy us. what about the fact you bring children into the world but you follow the ethos that denies them programs because you want to shut down the government, children who can't get a nutritious meal going to school and cutting after-school programs. it doesn't make sense saying get them into the world and then to hell with them. but that's what these guys are putting forward. and he's helping a guy ken cuccinelli who's so far to the right, i don't know how women will support him. he's against contraception. >> i remember being born into a world where there were 3% college loans. thank you. >>> up next, the affordable care act is certainly popular with one crowd. the late night comics. this is "hardball." i think "snl" is "hardball" these days. the place for politics. >>> i love this country. americans have waited 70 years for affordable health care. but if the website takes more than an hour, [ bleep ] it i'm watching a cat video. >> i saw the most unbelievable video today. this is real. this is unbelievable. watch what happened.
're put into a big pool, your rate will by science will go up. >> is it stkpw-g to work? -- is it going to work? >> i believe it is a lofty goal. i think it is a good idea for consumers to stop using the emergency room and to have wellness benefits is a good thing. i truly believet's see what hap. thank you. 20 minutes after the top of the hour. the e.p.a. shutting down a cheerleader squad's car wash claiming the car wash hurts the environment. is that government regulation gone too far? of course it is. one of the cheerleaders here next. >>> a russian operative put up front to spy on the united states. was it really inside a goodie bag they handed out at the summit? ♪ ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. medicare open enrollment. of year again. whole grains... time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. buit never hurts to see if u can find bettoverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care la open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the ti
. but health care is tough, medical science is changing, medicare in 1965, what doctors could do in 1965. there was no heart transplants, i remember, when doctor balky did the first heart transplan this was like man landing on the moon? don't givthe. neil: don't give away our age. but you are right. it started out as a third leg of the added to your pension, and to whatever savings you had. not your sole means of support when you retirement people want more support, the government is there. one thing leads to another? >> that is part of it, and you have limited information to project the future, often times you are wrong. in recent years, there has been deliberate gaming, we saw this with obamacare, we've seen it before, not just the democrats, republicans were doing it gaming the projects. so, a combination of all of those. but, i mean that public is right to be skeptical when somebody comes in with big new entitlement program. yeah cost never are what we project, they are always more. neil: i heard one analyst, switching around tv said this debacle of a roll out for health care, whethe
that deal with everything else in life that matters, you know, the stuff that's elegant, beautiful, science, art, poetry, all the dogs and cats, i have got a lot of that in there, too. but, in the end i decided i couldn't really because in the end unless you get your politics right everything else right and beautiful can be swept away. we see that in germany 1930s, china cultural revolution today in north korea. they have this crazy stalinist regime. the land is desolate. and also because i was once a doctor and i decided to become a writer for exactly that same reason. doctor doctor's life is a noble life. but, on the other hand, unless you get your politics right, unless society orders itself, it essentially is politics is the moat that protects you against by barians, external and internal. and that's why i got into writing. >> what's the biggest change in your politics? if you look back, like when you first started writing, early 800s, how you have changed the most? >> well, it is true that i was once a speech writer for walter mondale in 1980 and often asked how do you goat from walter
. thank you so much. >>> a school science project is stirring up controversy. why one parent says she's upset some kids are heading to a local brewery. >>> they're dancing in the seats of boston. we'll take a look at the major league celebration with a new world series champions. stay with us. [ sneezes, coughs ] i've got a big date, but my sinuses are acting up. it's time for advil cold and sinus. [ male announcer ] truth is that won't relieve all your symptoms. new alka seltzer plus-d relieves more sinus symptoms than any other behind the counter liquid gel. oh what a relief it is. than any other behind the counter liquid gel. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. tomato florentine soup, it took a little time to get it just right. [ ding ] ♪ but finally, it happened. perfection. at progresso, we've got a passion for quality, because you've got a passion
planning and effort, hopefully bob can retire at a more appropriate age. it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. travelers on edge after friday's deadly shooting at los angeles international airport. you might be surprised to know in the past two weeks. t.s.a. agents seized nearly 50 guns at airports across the country. that's not all. >> reporter: it's a scary thought. ticketed passengers trying to bring deadly weapons in their carry on bags but t.s.a. officials say it happens all the time, passengers carrying loaded guns to security check points. >> i'm shocked. i wouldn't believe they would try to do that. >> it's pretty scary. you could have somebody running in and shooting people. i guess that could happen, as we've seen in other places. >> reporter: a week before the l.a.x. shooting that left one t.s.a. agent dead, agents seized 39 guns at airports across the country. 32 were loaded. take a picture of the knives that were seized. one passenger tried to conceal a pocketknife as a disposable razor. one passenger tried to go through a securi
that science and engineering is good to do, because they will see it writ large on the paper. there will be calls for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is a notion of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we are going to dig through the soils of mars and look for life. look at the nasa portfolio today. chemistry, physics, geology -- planetary geology -- chemical engineers, mechanical engineers, all the stem fields represented in the nasa portfolio. umps that, asa p flywheel that society taps for innovations. >> booktv has aired over 40,000 programs about nonfiction books and authors. booktv, every weekend on c- span2. "washington journal" continues. host: we are back to the last remaining minutes of "washington to go outsideant washington and in your take on whether congress should endorse or stop the nsa spying program. you have seen the papers this morning, that president obama was made aware is past summer about spying on allies, and the head of the intelligence feinstein, said that that is a big problem and she would like to see a total review of
money now to rebuild the infrastructure of this country and invest in education, invest in basic science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to borrow. simplisticrty antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i and at the same time you strangle it of funding. down,ole government shut by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: here is a tweet -- thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> reaction with dick cheney. joining us juan williams and mary katharineham. both fox news analyst. juan, what say you? >> first of all i thought you said five-day forecasty. he had his heart beating and was five-day forecasty. had you your heart weeght with him. what do we get out of it? he can't answer you. he dodged and played games with that one and then he blames obama. >> he says we were able to neutralize bad dictators like qaddafi and khan and prevented a wholesale weapons of mass destruction. >> what did you say bill o'reilly? you said look things are falling apart as we see in iraq. threats still exist in the mountains of pakistan you say what did we get out of it? he couldn't answer you except point finger at obama and say karzai is corrupt. come on you know karzai is corrupt. >> i think when it comes to iraq. i think it's very fair to look at the situation and go look, we pulled out for what looked like frankly political reasons because they did not fry hard on the agreement before leaving there. >> at a point d
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> how to defend yourself against verbal attacks in a moment. first the mail from. from louisiana, dr. gruber isn't telling the truth or need s to revisit his coursework. i am covered by group insurance in my job and have been told my premiums will double. told in july our policy was cancelled. the new policy increased my costs 25%. dr. gruber is incompetent or a liar. my health insurance payments are going up dramatically. here is the overview on the obama care deal. if you are working, you will likely pay more and have a harder time seeing a doctor. if you are poor, great deal. in november 14 we'll see how voters respond. that will tell the tale for america. you and mcguirk made fun of the u.s. spying on merkel. maybe we should listen to how she runs germany. >> i'm tired of gutfeld mcguirk making a joke of everything. amy from georgia, i laugh every time those guys are on. from kansas, this week is my 11th birthday. hoping to get "kennedy's last days." i loved "lincoln's last day
need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. . >> thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly in the is it legal segment tonight. three hot topics, aging asian americans store stop halloween costume sale. with us is kimberly guilfoyle and lis wiehl. tell me why these costumes. put them up on the screen. >> put them up. >> tell me why they are offensive. >> the can i money know is kimono. >> that's the guy in a traditional asian kimoo. >> this is a sushi chef. >> i like that. >> elegant. look, if you. >> so that's offensive? >> apparently to this organization it's offensive. but, absolutely. look. >> i don't want any apparentlies. offensive or not? >> no. >> i have the kimono at home. it's nice. >> why didn't you wear it? >> i should have. >> so two nos. let's put the sushi guy up again. i don't need sushi because japanese means bacteria. i could be wrong about that i thought that this guy was the soccer player in japan. oh, no, no, no. so he is a sushi chef, what's offensive about a sushi chef? >> the organization says they d
surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "hannity" time to reveal what have you chosen for video of the date. jay leno who nbc was dumb enough to fire not once, but twice ripping into the administration's botched rollout. take a look. >> reporting the president has known for three years people would lose their coverage. the press is now saying the president lied. the today the white house says it's not true, he did not lie. here is the tape from three years ago. >> if you like your doctor, you cannot keep your doctor. if you like your private health insurance, you cannot keep it. >> remember the old days? michelle biden? what happens to that? >> why would nbc be dumb enough to do that twice? i don't know. don't forget send us your obama care horror stories. i'm going to read some tomorrow night on the air. thank you for being with us, start your day each weekday morning with fox and friends. we'll see you back here tomorrow night. ♪ ♪ >>> the o'reilly factor is on. tonight: >> there is no excuse for it. and i take ful
headlines. >> i learned something new about maria molina. did you know she used to be a science teacher? >> no. >> 7th grade science teacher. >> really? >> anyway, that's your interesting tidbit for the day. got some headlines. did you hear about this? a new york university student who slipped between two buildings in downtown new york city, was missing for 36 hours and he has finally been found. he was lodged between the two buildings, a dorm and also a parking garage. the space was just two feet wide. it took an hour and a half for first responders to reach him. they had to break a wall just to get him out. >> had we not told the security guards, the three of us 19-year-old students to check the roof, they would not have found him for who knows how long and he would probably be dead right now. >> the student was reportedly on his dorm roof building, 17 stories high, and we're told that he was taking part in a fire drill when he slipped between the building. he's hospitalized in serious condition. >>> looks like a scene from the movie, but these incredible images show the aftermath of
, lamborghini is still exploring the limits of the science of engineering and the art of irrational romance. >> go to 60minutesovertime.com to find out what it feels like to go more than 15o miles an hour in a lamborghini. sponsored by pfizer. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inflammation. plus, in clinical studies, celebrex is proven to improve daily physical function so moving is easier. celebrex can be taken with or without food. and it's not a narcotic. you and your doctor should balance the benefits with the risks. all prescription nsaids, like celebrex, ibuprofen, naproxen and meloxicam have the same cardiovascular warning. they all may increase the chance of heart attack or stroke, which can lead
science whether it is biomedical or other forms of science that would create jobs down the road, those are all good reasons to orrow. this tea party simplistic antagonism toward any form of debt or deficits is not only misplaced, it is foolhardy and you cannot be out there saying i am for jobs and at the same time ou strangle it of funding. the whole government shutdown by some estimates, cost $24 billion in economic activity. people lost jobs and paychecks and were not hired and we are still reeling from that. that is just not good policy. host: on the subject of the shutdown. communist dog rights -- writes in on twitter -- guest: thanks for writing in. i think right now there is absolutely no telling. as anybody who watches c-span knows, the news cycles just get quicker and quicker and shorter and shorter. we will have another government budget and debt ceiling fight or some episode engendering february. it may happen again in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they wer
talents and interests spanned both art and science. one of his most famous works is the pe trooufian man, wildly held to represent the artist's keen interest in proportion and attempts to relate man to nature. "the figure has two centers, one spiritual, within the circle and is in the naval, and the other physical, located in the genitals and which is in the center of the square." what a mind could conceive such things would make of ""the davinci code"" with its plot riddled with historical factual errors doesn't bear thinking about. but from the box office to the bookstore, blockbusters have generated millions of dollars, money the man himself would no doubt have put to good use in his seemingly endless quest for knowledge. so far, uncovering the latest work has used tools da vinci would have been familiar with -- scalpels and hammers. fully exposing it will require modern technology including lasers, ultrasound scaling and chemicals. given the extent of his intellect and curiosity, one can't help but think that the master would approve. charlie, norah, gayle? >> thank you, but where ha
of the top nuclear experts, a former iaea weapons inspector. this institute for science and international security monitors iran's maker program as closely as any nongovernment group. their conclusion released last week, iran could reduce enough weapons grade highly enriched uranium in as little as one month. that is vastly shorter than what the obama administration has repeatedly said that it would take iran a year to have enough uranium for a bomb. we have been hearing those estimates for years. a former weapons inspector concludes iran would have to eliminate more than half of its 19,000 centrifuges to extend the time it would take to build a bomb to six months, bill. bill: there's a reason we're hearing so much about this now, iran's capacity. why is that, jennifer? >> essentially because the restoratiomenstruation began nes with iran in geneva october 15 and its lead negotiator and the white house have been trying to convince congress not to impose more sanctions. there is a bill on the table by senator mark kirk of illinois, a republican who want to impose more sanctions on iran. th
and science. one of his most famous works is to be truvian man. alisa is a specialist in the acad mia gallery in venice. this has two. one spiritual and the other physical, located in the genitals what is in the center of the square. >> what a mind it would make. from the box office to the bookstore, da vinci blockbusters have generated millions of dollar. money he would have put to good use. so far uncovering the latest work he used tools he would have been familiar with. scalpels and hammers. fully exposing it will require modern technology including lasers, ultrasound and chemicals. one can't help but think that the matter would approving. charlie, norah, gayle? >> thank you, but where have you bee be been? >> reporter: i've . >>> a new book argues that president kennedy should never have been assassinated because the fbi knew that lee harvey oswald was a threat. it was hidden from the warren commission. that's ahead on "cbs this morning." >> announcer: this morning's "eye opener" at 8:00 is sponsored by benefiber. benefit with benefiber. and feel better about doing it. better it with bene
of the sudden they are out of business. >> it's not rooted in science. congress shouldn't be messing around with things it doesn't understand. >> congress likes to do that remember last week they pretended they understood how the internet worked. coming up on the show, just when you thought obama care couldn't get any worse it, does the ceo of one of the biggest investigation for fraud of the bombshell report you need to hear next. just in the nick of time meet the woman who claims the lottery ticket with just hours to spare. moments really. >> that could happen to you, oh, wait, no. [ fishing rod casting line, marching band playing ] [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping ] sounds good. campbell's healthy request. m'm! m'm! good.® i get out a lot... except when it's too cold. like the last three weekends. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect mfamily. you
. meteorological science. >> what happened this morning was a partial eclipse. >> a viewer said, yeah, i'm up for the solar eclipse. >> boy, that guy is misinformed. >> it was a partial solar eclipse along the eastern seaboard. if you had some clear skies across the northeast, there was cloud cover. can you take pictures of that easily, clayton? >> if you have the proper camera because if you look through that you'll burn your eyeball. >> exactly. if you have the proper camera and took some pictures, send them to us so we can share them to you. down across the southeast would have been your best time to see that. very clear skies across the coast and the northeast, still some cloud cover, scattered showers and rain as well. not as good a shot of this across the east coast. by the time the sunrises any farther inland the eclipse is over with. out across the west, we have some rain showers and snow that will develop across parts of the rockies. we'll watch for some increased shower activity across parts of the southern plains by the time we get towards tomorrow. temperature wise it will get muc
you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. was a truly amazing day.ey,. without angie's list, i don't know if we could have found all the services we needed for our riley. from contractors and doctors to dog sitters and landscapers. you can find it all on angie's list. join today. maestro of project management. baron of the build-out. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (aaron) purrrfect. (vo) meee-ow, business pro. meee-ow. go national. go like a pro. >> joining us now for faith on friday. president obama's spiritual adviser and the author of the president's devotional. a daily prayer, stories and scriptures he sent to the president to help inspire him. very good to have you on the show. what would be the prayer today? >> today was actually about fear and how to overcome fear and bounce back. i use the gre
or expenditures on science and technology. the chinese seem to have a better space program than we do these days. >> you mention defense. we've got a graphic that shows how defense spending as a percentage of the tkpwopd has gone -- as a percent of the g.d.p. has gone down. in 2012 it was 12.3%. fast forward to the 2016 estimate and it looks like just 3.1%. what's the matter with spending less on our national defense, professor? >> let's look at what's happening in the middle east and asia. in the middle east we've abandoned egypt, for example, narrowing our focus. they justify this by saying we're shifting resources to asia. look at what has shifted to asia. not that much. now the japanese, the prime minister is saying that japan has to rearm to protect itself from china because they understand that just as the president abandoned morsi to the mob in the streets, when it really counts on those islands, the americans might not have the punch to do what's needed and they're going to have to look at for themselves. >> you say beware, america. if half the country right now is on some sort of entitl
a demonstration because one of my science teachers did this to illustrate what dry ice is and the process this goes through 'cause it goes through something called sublimation, which is when ice goes from a substance to a gas. here is dry ice. everybody know what is it looks like. for halloween, you can drop it into a cup of hot water and then it will create that fog. it's a little breezy. so it's actually going towards the side over here. this is something you can do on halloween. if you're safe in a well ventilated area and with gloves, of course. now let's look at the weather conditions across the country because we do have some extreme weather to tell you about, especially across parts of texas where we have flash flood warnings in effect and watches stretching up through sections of missouri. we've had eight inches of rain in some of these areas. again, very dangerous weather ongoing across that area. now we want to take a look at that storm system producing some areas of rain, from texas all the way up into the great lakes and later on this afternoon, we do have the risk for severe
probably heard that practicing medicine is a -- it's an art, really, not a science. and when doctors are trying to even diagnose things, sometimes it's the -- you know, they prescribe a few things and then they realize what you had after something finally worked. i don't see how it can be pay performance like a job and a normal business where, you know, hey, if you do well, you get paid. if you don't -- how could you design a system, really, that's totally dependent on favorable outcomes? it seems like a difficult thing to do in practice. >>el with, i think it is difficult. but our current payment system doesn't begin to look at the complexity of care or the range of outcomes. there's nothing in there to really motivate and stimulate moving towards a more efficient system. in nearly 30 years of practice as a neurologist, seeing patients with complex care, probably 30% of the patients say were misdiagnosed and had the wrong tests done and some were treated inappropriately and that causes a lot of waste. >> do you get your money back from the doctor if that happens or the guy loses his
on science and technology, transportation and infrastructure, she co-chairs the woman's caucus and she is the chair of the democratic women's working group. she also co-founded the national network to end domestic violence in 1994. she was the executive director. am proud to ask my colleague, the honorable donna edwards, to consume as much time as she may. ms. edwards: i thank the gentleman and i thank you very and i know that you join with your colleague, mr. poe of texas, in hosting this hour so that we can have an opportunity to remember why it is that we identify and commemorate domestic violence awareness month. and to make a commitment from this day forward and this coming year to the next time when we have this observance to do what we can to end domestic violence. and i think after all that is the goal. i can't remember, mr. green, when i first became interested in domestic violence. and even aware of domestic violence. but i look back to the times when i was growing up, i grew up in a military family, and we lived in very close quarters and our neighbors, we shared a wall in t
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)